Our Staff

Save the Elephants is proud of the wide diversity of talents that have come together to fight for a future for elephants under our banner. From the founding of the organisation more than twenty years ago it has always combined world-leading scientific minds with the unrivalled experience and deep, intuitive knowledge of African cultures that have long co-existed with elephants. STE’s founder, Iain Douglas-Hamilton, conducted the first behavioural studies of wild African elephants. Since setting up a long term study of the elephants of Samburu in northern Kenya, he has nurtured a new generation of researchers and conservationists from the local area and around the world, all of whom share the same passion and commitment to making sure that elephants continue to grace African landscapes.

Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton, CBE

Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton, CBE

Founder & CEO

One of the world’s foremost authorities on the African elephant, Dr Douglas-Hamilton pioneered the first in-depth scientific study of elephant social behaviour in Tanzania’s Lake Manyara National Park at age 23. He received a DPhil in zoology from the University of Oxford. During the 1970s he investigated the status of elephants throughout Africa and was the first to alert the world to the ivory poaching holocaust. He chronicled how Africa’s elephant population was halved between 1979 and 1989 and helped bring about the world ivory trade ban. Iain and his wife Oria have co-authored two award-winning books, “Among the Elephants” and “Battle for the Elephants” and have made numerous television films. He founded Save the Elephants in 1993 at the suggestion of Felix Appelbe in order to create an effective and flexible NGO dedicated specifically to elephants. He serves on the data review task force of the African Elephant Specialist Group of IUCN, and the Technical Advisory Group for MIKE. He also conducts regular lecture tours and works with the media to promote STE’s mission and awareness of elephants in general. Over the last few years Iain has spoken at numerous conferences including the Wildlife Conservation Network, and the 7th World Wilderness Congress. In 2012, Dr. Douglas-Hamilton spoke before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Ivory and Insecurity: The Global Implications of Poaching in Africa. In 2013, Iain’s high level meeting at the White House was followed by both the Obama Executive Order, and the Clinton Global Initiative Commitment to action to Stop the Killing, Stop the Trafficking and Stop the Demand for ivory. Additionally, Iain has spoken at Universities, Zoological Societies, Embassies and private fundraising functions throughout Europe and America. His chief research interest is to understand elephant choices by studying their movements. For his work on elephants he was awarded one of conservation’s highest awards the Order of the Golden Ark in 1988 and the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2015. Dr Iain Douglas-Hamilton was named the recipient of the 2010 Indianapolis Prize, one of the world’s leading awards for animal conservation. In recognition for his lifetime achievements, he received the Lilly Medal at a gala ceremony presented by Cummins Inc., at The Westin Hotel in Indianapolis.

Dr. George Wittemyer

Dr. George Wittemyer

Chairman, STE Scientific Board

Dr. Wittemyer serves as the Chairman of the Scientific Board of Save the Elephants and is an assistant professor in the Dept. of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology at Colorado State University. His research focuses on biodiversity conservation issues, with an emphasis on determining how landscapes, humans, and climate impact demography, distribution and movement of at risk wildlife populations. As a Fulbright Fellow in 1997, he founded the long term Samburu elephant monitoring project, on which he has been working ever since. He completed his PhD in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley in 2005 on the Socio-Ecology of the Samburu elephants. He joined the IUCN’s African Elephants Specialist Group in 2008 and currently serves as a technical advisor on elephants to the Kenya Wildlife Service. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed manuscripts on elephants and is currently working directly on elephant conservation projects in Kenya, Central African Republic, and Namibia as well as collaborating on elephant conservation projects across Africa.

Frank Pope

Frank Pope

Chief Operations Officer

Frank is Chief Operations Officer of Save the Elephants. Frank studied zoology at the University of Edinburgh. After leading coral reef survey expeditions he began a 7-year fascination with shipwrecks, working around the world for Oxford University’s Maritime Archaeological Research & Excavation unit and publishing a non-fiction account of an ill-starred expedition to the South China Sea, Dragon Sea (Penguin, 2007). He then joined London’s newspaper The Times as the world’s only Ocean Correspondent to cover the fast-changing science and environment of the sea, during which he published 72 Hours (Orion, 2011) and made the BBC series “Britain’s Secret Seas”. Frank is married to Saba Douglas-Hamilton, daughter of STE founder Iain, and they live in Kenya with their three small children Selkie, Luna and Mayian.

Dr. Ben Okita

Dr. Ben Okita

Head of Research Operations

Dr Benson Okita-Ouma, PhD., MBS. (Ben or Okita) holds a Bachelor degree in wildlife management from Moi University, Kenya; A Masters degree in Conservation Biology from the University of Kent in the United Kingdom, and is a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Resource Ecology from the Wageningen University in the Netherlands where he studied density dependence reproductive performance in black rhino. He worked with the Kenya Wildlife Service for 18 years serving in different capacities in the department of species conservation and management. His latest duties included the senior scientist and national rhino coordinator at Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) for nearly 9 years and later acted as the head of Conservation Programmes at KWS. Okita has served as a member of the IUCN-SSC-African Rhino Specialist Group since 2003 and in 2010 he was appointed to the position of the Deputy Chair of this IUCN group. Okita is also a member of the editorial board of the Pachyderm Journal that publishes biannually peer reviewed articles on elephants and rhinos. He has represented Kenya at several meetings of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES – www.cites.org) and made significant contributions on behalf of the Government particularly in the amendments of CITES resolutions aimed at ensuring illegal trade in rhino horn does not impede rhino conservation. Apart from the conservation work, Ben’s love for children has led him to support education and community development in the Homa Bay County since 2000. In 2008, the former president Mwai Kibaki of Kenya, conferred on him the highest National accolade, the Moran of the Order of the Burning Spear (MBS) for his distinguished service to the nation. Okita joins Save The Elephants Organization (STE) as its head of research operations and brings in his coordination and negotiation skills. He is keen to contribute to the vision of STE by using his negotiation skills to highlight the need for inclusion of wildlife corridors and dispersal areas in national planning.

Dr. Chris Thouless, QGM

Dr. Chris Thouless, QGM

Strategic Advisor

Dr. Chris Thouless has nearly 30 years of experience working for governments, NGOs and private sector in Africa and Asia. He is a specialist in wildlife conservation, community-based natural resource management, project management, protected area planning and management, public private partnerships and tourism development. He has a particular interest in elephant conservation, having worked on elephant movement patterns, human wildlife conflict and elephant surveys in several countries. He was Chairman of CITES Panel of Experts on the African Elephant in  1996 and has been a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission since 1986, currently being responsible for the African Elephant Database. He has held a number of senior positions, including coordinator of the reconstruction of the Nairobi National Museum, director of Millenium Challenge Corporation investments in community conservation in Namibia, senior wildlife biologist for the Kalahari in Botswana, chief advisor on sustainable tourism to the government of Namibia and deputy director of the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, a leading private sector conservation organisation in Kenya. Chris holds an MA in zoology from the University of Oxford, and a PhD from the University of Cambridge. He was awarded the Queen’s Gallantry Medal in 1991.

Dr. Lucy King

Dr. Lucy King

Head of Human-Elephant Co-Existence Program

Dr Lucy King was brought up in Somalia, Lesotho and Kenya. She has been researching the use of honey bees as a natural deterrent for crop-raiding elephants since 2006, and has published her findings in numerous scientific journals. Her DPhil thesis, through Oxford University and in partnership with Save the Elephants and Disney’s Animal Kingdom, was awarded the UNEP/CMS Thesis Award 2011 from the United Nations Environment Program’s Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species. She won The Future for Nature Award and The St Andrews Prize for the Environment in 2013. She is actively involved in the Kenyan Elephant Forum (KEF) and in 2013 she was invited to join IUCN’s African Elephant Specialist Group. Previously she completed an MSc in Biology, Integrative Bioscience, from Balliol College, Oxford (2006) and gained a First Class degree in Zoology from Bristol University (1999). Between 2000 and 2005, she led numerous conservation projects and adventurous expeditions to Africa and South America in her role as Operations Director for Quest Overseas. She now lives in Nairobi with her partner, leading further research into the use of bees as an elephant deterrent both in Kenya and further afield.

Saba Douglas-Hamilton

Saba Douglas-Hamilton

Special Projects Director

Saba is a passionate conservationist, communicator and TV host. She served as a Trustee of Save the Elephants (STE) for a decade and is now Chair of the Advisory Board. Having gained a first class degree in Social Anthropology (MA) from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, her first job was with Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia, running a community conservation project to protect the rare desert-adapted black rhino. She joined Save the Elephants (STE) as head of operations in 1997, helping build up the NGO’s research station in Samburu National Reserve. In 2000 she began her career as a wildlife filmmaker, hosting nine TV series including Secret Life of Elephants, Big Cat Diary, and Unknown Africa, and over twenty-four documentaries for the BBC, and producing two award-winning films for Animal Planet, Heart of a Lioness and Rhino Nights. After taking a sabbatical to raise her family, she has recently returned to filmmaking with a new 10 part BBC series, This Wild Life, and runs the family’s eco-lodge, Elephant Watch Camp, in Samburu.

Wainaina Kimani

Wainaina Kimani

Chief Finance and Administration Officer
Festus Ihwagi

Festus Ihwagi

Head GIS Analyst

Festus joined Save the Elephants research team in 2005 with a special interest in elephant habitat interactions. He studied the impacts of elephants on the woody plant community along the Ewaso River and observed selective utilization of their bark by elephants. He then joined the team with skills in GIS which opened up a dual role as a GIS analyst.He is also involved in the participatory Monitoring of Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE) program where he team leads the harmonization of mortality records. His interests lie in understanding the drivers, spatial and temporal dynamics of poaching across the African elephant range; the subject of his doctoral thesis at the University of Twente, Netherlands. His full profile and publications can be seen here.

Resson Kantai Duff

Resson Kantai Duff

Head of Awareness

Resson has a Master’s Degree in Biodiversity, Conservation and Management from the University of Oxford where she focused on community conservation, human wildlife conflict and mobilizing for sustainable change. She also holds a First Class degree in Zoology from the University of Nairobi. She works as the Head of Awareness, runs the internship program, and acts as a liaison person with the Kenya Elephant Forum. She also consults as a writer and editor for the International Institute for Sustainable Development Reporting Services, which covers numerous Multilateral Environmental Agreements. Her concentration here is in Biodiversity and CITES based on her experience working in conservation. When she is not immersed in work related challenges, she enjoys life in the bush, singing and spending time with friends.

Gemma Francis

Gemma Francis

International Donor Relations

After 7 years in the charity sector in London, and 2 years in events and marketing Gemma joined Save the Elephants in 2010 to pursue her interest in elephant conservation. Gemma heads up and is responsible for international donor relations and fundraising. Prior to this she assisted the Founder and CEO, Iain Douglas-Hamilton, in his ongoing mission to save Africa’s elephants. Her love for elephant conservation grew from her travels around the world, and more specifically whilst volunteering at an elephant sanctuary in Northern Thailand where she was responsible for one of the Thai Royal Families’ elephants. Following her incredible journey inside an elephant’s mind, an expedition to Kenya lead her to assist at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy on the highly publicised, international translocation project for four of the world’s seven remaining Northern White Rhinos, an attempt to save the species from extinction. Her illuminating experience working briefly but closely with two of the worlds most threatened species justified her passion and commitment to help secure their future.

David Daballen

David Daballen

Head of Field Operations - Samburu Camp

David is Head of Field Operations, and has worked for STE for over a decade now. He has been featured in several films and documentaries (BBC, Nat Geo, etc) and in addition has been quoted severally on the local media houses on wildlife related matters. A Diploma holder in wildlife management, David has been head of Long Term Monitoring program (LTM) and can individually identify about 500 Samburu elephants on sight – a very unique talent. Besides monitoring elephants, he has also participated in over 100 radio collaring operation. Due to the recent surge in poaching, David has been involved in planning and organizing several community meetings, aimed at combating the scourge on ground level and acts as link between the project, communities and the local authority. At the same time, David has been fortunate enough to represent STE during fundraising and awareness events in the US and in China respectively and has good relations with Chinese goodwill ambassadors such as Yao Ming and Li Bingbing.

Melissa Groo

Melissa Groo

Elephant News Service

Melissa has been running the news listservs for Save the Elephants since 2001. She also worked for years for Cornell University’s Elephant Listening Project with scientist Katy Payne, studying the communication of forest elephants in the Central African Republic. She is deeply committed to elephant conservation and to keeping thousands of people worldwide updated on breaking news on elephants in the wild. She lives in upstate New York and is also a professional wildlife photographer. You can check out her work at her website.

Leslie Nalwa

Leslie Nalwa

Administrative Assistant to CEO and Founder

Lesley is the Administrative Assistant to the CEO and Founder. She is responsible for organizing and updating the CEO’s diary and schedule on a daily basis and the organization of all activities, events, meetings and communications on the CEO’s behalf. She is also responsible for organizing all international fund-raising trips and events for the CEO, ensuring all travel requirements are booked and planned well in advance. Lesley’s management skills include 10 years of business management experience. In addition she has experience in human resource and her expertise includes employee relations management, recruitment, hiring, policies and organizational development.

Njoki Kibanya

Njoki Kibanya

Office Administrator and Online Collaborator

Njoki is one of the longest serving members of STE and is Office Administration for the STE Nairobi office. She holds a Diploma in Office Management and Secretarial Services. She’s in charge of maintaining the office’s communication and internet systems ensuring they are fully operational at all times, offering support, supply or otherwise to the field staff and researchers, control of the office Petty Cash, purchase of all office supplies and maintaining inventories among many ad hoc office tasks that ensure the company runs smoothly. In addition, Njoki manages the website, Elephant bibliography, photo library and donor management support for the CRS database in liaison with the Head of Donor Relations. When not engaged in the office, you will find her spending time with her daughter Kui and nephew or engaging in farming upcountry.

Gilbert Sabinga

Gilbert Sabinga

Camp Manager - Samburu

Gilbert is the Camp Manager at Save the Elephants. He provides direction and logistical support for all field staff in Samburu, while undertaking roles in finance management, administration and database updating. He also hosts and guides interns and visiting researchers, ensuring all their needs are met. His skills as a GIS technician serve him in monitoring elephant movement via STE’s cutting-edge tracking system viewed on Google Earth. He has participated Esri East Africa User Conference and numerous international conferences on Biodiversity, land use and climate change in Nairobi, and the African GIS Google outreach launch in Uganda. Gilbert previously worked with the Kenya Wildlife Service as Rhino research assistant. In 2013, he was nominated for the Project Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation, which he undertook in Washington DC.

Jerenimo Lepirei

Jerenimo Lepirei

Research and Community Outreach Officer

Jerenimo is a research assistant at Save the Elephants, where he conducts long-term monitoring of the elephant subpopulation that uses Samburu and Buffalo Springs National Reserves. Able to recognize over three hundred elephants on sight, Jerenimo takes researchers and interns out to the field; introducing them to the elephant families and to the orphans he also monitors. He takes part in data entry and helps in Monitoring Illegal Killing of the Elephants project (MIKE) in recording carcasses. He designed and is spearheading STE’s community outreach program that has reformed a number of poachers to conservation ambassadors, also is involved in high-level county government campaign meetings. In addition, he assists the anti-poaching patrol team in responding to poaching incidents. Jerenimo participated in elephant’s aerial census in Tsavo and Samburu ecosystem. Previously, he worked as a research assistant for Ewaso Lions, where he helped to identify lions individually in the greater Samburu ecosystem. He expanded his interest in individual recognition of wildlife as an assistant for the Reticulated Giraffe Project, where he collected demographic census data on the population. In 2013/2014 Jerenimo undertook the Emerging Wildlife Conservation Leaders course and was intermittently based in the United States.

Dr. Jake Wall

Dr. Jake Wall

Database Manager

Jake Wall is a research scientist with Save the Elephants. Jake joined STE in 2003 and developed the real-time monitoring system for tracking elephants. He is also using GIS and remote sensing to study elephant movement ecology in Mali, Kenya, South Africa and Central Africa.

David Kimanzi

David Kimanzi

Research Assistant, GIS

David is the research assistant in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). He is involved in the monitoring of elephant movements via the STE tracking program and Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE). He is a member of the Transborder GIS Work Group which came up with conservation maps for the Kenya and Tanzania Trans boarder region. The Geography degree holder has previously worked as a GIS analyst with leading consultancy firms in the field of GIS and remote sensing and participated in feasibility mapping of key national infrastructure including LAPSSET (Lamu Port Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport corridor), Mombasa-Kigali Oil Pipeline among others.

Barnerd Lesowapir

Barnerd Lesowapir

GIS
Michael Koskei

Michael Koskei

Research Assistant, GIS

Michael is a research assistant, GIS. He is involved mainly on elephant tracking and mapping around the bee-hive fenced farms on the Tsavo Ecosystem. He joined STE in January 2015, after undergoing an internship in our Elephant and Bees project in Sagalla, Tsavo. Michael has Bachelors in Geography, Moi University and has pursued Msc. GIS and Remote Sensing from Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology. He has previously worked as a GIS project officer at Flametree Systems Engineering Ltd, in Nairobi and later as a GIS consultant at International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) East Africa. At ILRI, he was involved in building up a Geodatabase of biophysical, livelihood and economic variables meant for National Climate Change Action Plan. Michael is keen on applying remote sensing and other geospatial techniques to understand the spatial relationships, interactions and patterns within the wildlife ranges.

Chris Leadismo

Chris Leadismo

Security
Dennis Mwangi

Dennis Mwangi

Assistant Accountant

Dennis is the assistant accountant at STE. His main duties include assisting the CFAO with managing all STE Kenya accounts and Financial statements ,assisting the CFAO with payroll duties and other statutory obligations, management of Langata office petty cash ,management of STE inventory and disbursement of monthly student allowances. Dennis is a holder of a Bachelor of commerce degree (Finance) from Kenyatta University and is a continuing Certified Public accounts student.

Consolata Makadi

Consolata Makadi

Conservation Education Assistant

Consolata joined Save the Elephants in March 2015 as an intern in the department of Conservation education. She is mainly involved in conducting conservation lessons in schools that lie within elephant corridors in Samburu and Isiolo Counties. She is also involved in mentorship and tuition programs for STE/EWS scholarship students, as well as, communicating with the education donors. She holds a First Class degree in Environmental Science from Egerton University. She is also registered an Associate expert in Environment Impact Assessment/Audit, by the National Environment Management Authority.

Daud Abdi

Daud Abdi

Head of Mammal Census and Field Education Officer

Daud began work at STE three years ago as an intern. He assisted Resson in her education visits to local schools as well as helping with LTM and mammal census. After several months Daud became a permanent staff member, leading mammal surveys in order to keep track of the populations of different species in Samburu and Buffalo Springs National Reserves. In addition he visits schools to teach and show video footage of wildlife to encourage children and the community to support conservation.

Wilson Lelukumani

Wilson Lelukumani

Field Assistant

Wilson is the Field Assistant in Kenya for the Elephants and Bees Project, overseeing data collection in the Samburu beehive project sites in Ngare Mara and Attan communities and helping down in Tsavo when extra help is needed. Wilson is from the Turkana tribe and has seen human-wildlife conflict escalate within his community. He is now a vocal advocate of the Beehive Fence deterrent system and is encouraging beekeeping activities within his community. As a field officer for the Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE) project in Samburu, Wilson is acutely aware of the threat of humans to the lives of elephants in the area and believes that reducing human-elephant conflict could help improve the attitudes of local farmers and pastoralists to elephants.

Njoroge Ng’ang’a

Njoroge Ng’ang’a

Office Assistant
Barako Hussein

Barako Hussein

Facilities and Security Officer
Stephen Lekanai

Stephen Lekanai

Camp Chef
Stanley Musyoki

Stanley Musyoki

Camp Chef

Stanley is the newest member of the Save the Elephants team. He began work in the research camp as a chef in July of 2015. Prior to working with Save the Elephants, he was a chef at Riverside Camp for five years. This experience has made him an excellent cook, to the joy of everyone living in camp, who welcomed him with open arms. Stanley enjoys a good joke and has a bright smile that lights up the kitchen. He is originally from Machakos, Kenya.

Lembara Kiripis

Lembara Kiripis

Camp Caretaker
Jackson Lekisolish

Jackson Lekisolish

Security Guard

Jackson Lekisolish is a night security guard at Save the Elephants Research Camp, where he started work in January of 2014. In addition to braving the night hours, he assists with camp maintenance during the day. Jackson’s bright smile and good sense of humor have made him an excellent addition to the team. Prior to working for Save the Elephants, Jackson worked as a security guard for Crowns Foods Limited. Jackson is from Maralal, Kenya, where his family now lives.

Andrew Leteteya

Andrew Leteteya

Security Guard

Andrew Leteteya, fondly know as “Senior,” is from Sasaab, Kenya. He has been a night guard at Save the Elephants Research Camp since 2007. Prior to working with Save the Elephants, he was a Kenyan police officer for 12 ½ years. His experience in law enforcement and the many years he has spent guarding camp make its occupants feel very safe. In the past, Senior has also spent time working at Maasai Lodge Hotel in Nairobi. He has six children, two girls and four boys, as well as uncountable cousins.

Rimland Lemojong

Rimland Lemojong

Camp Caretaker

Rimland A. Lemojong is from Ngilae, Wamba in the foot of the Matthews Ranges. He earned his certification at Kenya Utalii College, where he studied tourism hospitality, graduating in 2004. Rimland worked at two famous tourism hotels in East Africa before joining Save the Elephants in February of 2014. He is one of the primary maintenance staff members at Save the Elephants Research Camp. He takes utmost care of all stationed at the camp and sees to it that everything stays in prime condition. Rimland is a long distance runner, a very good footballer, and a chronic novel reader. He is also a repository of geographical and historical knowledge, always with a fun fact in his back pocket, to the delight of all who traverse camp.

Joseph Abo

Joseph Abo

Caretaker

Joseph Abo is from Ngaremara, Kenya. He began work with Save the Elephants in February of 2014, where he works as a caretaker in the research camp. Abo has a very strong work ethic; he cleans compounds, washes dishes, pumps water, chases troublesome monekys and baboons out of camp, and completes various other necessary tasks on a daily basis. Abo has two young daughters. He enjoys running and watching football.

David Letitiya

David Letitiya

Field Assistant

David Letitiya is from Ngurunit in northern Kenya. He began work as a research assistant with Save the Elephants in October of 2014. He is part of the long-term monitoring team, and can therefore differentiate approximately 500 elephants on sight. In addition to collecting daily demographic data in the field, David assists with dung collection for the orphan project, helps with collaring operations, and enters all collected data into the long-term database for future analyses. He is also the all-purpose guy in camp, always ready to jump up and do anything that is needed; he can often be found transporting park rangers, helping in emergency situations, and supporting general camp operations. David earned his diploma in wildlife management from the Kenya Wildlife Training Institute in Naivasha, Kenya in 2011. Save the Elephants is his first place of work, and he is appreciative and honored to be a part of the team.

Our Trustees

PROF. FRITZ VOLLRATH
Fritz-Vollrath

Chairman

Prof. Fritz Vollrath, the Chairman of Save the Elephants, studied in Germany and obtained his PhD (with a thesis on spider behaviour) in 1977 from Freiburg University. He completed research fellowships and fieldwork with the Max Plank Institute in Seewiesen and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. After 9 years in Oxford as Royal Society Post-doctorate Research Fellow and University Research Associate, 5 years in Switzerland (Basel) as Associate Professor and 8 years in Denmark (Aarhus) as Professor of Zoology, he is now back at the University of Oxford as Visiting Research Professor in the Department of Zoology and Senior Research Associate of Balliol College. Prof Vollrath’s research focuses on the evolution of spider web-building behaviour and on the extraordinary properties of the silk used to build the webs. His studies on the spider’s movements during web construction have led to analysis tools and novel insights into animal decision making. STE employs these findings at the other end of the scale of animal sizes while investigating elephant movements and decisions. Prof Vollrath has been an STE Trustee since the year 2002. In 2003 he became the new STE Chairman when Dr. Iain Douglas-Hamilton became President and CEO of the organisation. Together they published the first paper in 2002 on the use of African honeybees to prevent elephants from foraging on acacia trees. Prof. Fritz Vollrath, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK. Office: +44-1865-271234, Fax: +44-1865-358221

FELIX APPELBE
Felix-A_1

Trustee

Felix Appelbe is a co-founding trustee with Dr Iain Douglas-Hamilton. Felix is both passionate about Africa and conservation and the promotion of eco-tourism using local people. A solicitor specializing in forming charities and a farmer in the Cotswolds, Felix is actively involved in running the charity on a day-to-day basis, holding Trustees meetings, supervising the charity’s banking, and considering how to maximize the interests of the charity from a legal perspective. Read about Felix Appelbe’s work as head of the private client department of Ambrose Appelbe, a London firm of solicitors: http://www.ambrose.appelbe.co.uk/FelixAppelbe.htm

AMBROSE CAREY
Ambrose-Carey

Trustee

Ambrose Carey has joined STE’s Board of Trustees. Ambrose first came to Africa at the age of 19 when he joined Iain Douglas-Hamilton in a campaign to save Uganda’s hard pressed elephants, at a time when the country was in the midst of a civil war. Ambrose has remained passionate about wildlife and, 32 years on. Ambrose Carey co-founded Alaco, a highly successful business intelligence firm in London.  His clients include banks, corporations, law firms and private investors, with whom he works on a full range of issues, from due diligence to fraud investigations.  Over the course of a 25-year career in business intelligence, he has been involved in some of the most high profile asset tracing cases of the past few decades.  He has particular experience in the Middle East, travelling frequently to the Gulf and Saudi Arabia.  He also works closely with a number of private banks in Switzerland. Ambrose began his career in Saudi Arabia, before entering the business intelligence industry in 1987.  He set up his first company with Amy Lashinsky in 1995, which led to Alaco’s formation in 2002.  He has a degree from the University of East Anglia. He will bring extra commitment to Save the Elephants and a unique set of skills. For more information visit: http://www.alaco.com/

MARLENE MCCAY
Marlene

Trustee

Marlene McCay joined the Board of Trustees in the year 2001 and has continued to be one of Save the Elephants major supporters. In June 2003, Marlene McCay began a project in collaboration with STE and Kruger National Park to examine the population dynamics and movement of elephants within the Associated Private Nature Reserves (APNR) and the adjacent Kruger National Park (KNP). Together with STE and Timbavati Private Nature Reserve, Marlene has pioneered the Green Hunting of elephants as a complete alternative to lethal hunting.

PETER HENDERSON
Pete-Henderson

Trustee

Pete Henderson joined the Board of Trustees in 2004. He is the CEO of Indigo Telecom Ltd, a company providing satellite solutions for voice and Internet connectivity and is also an independent investor in telecommunication companies worldwide. Pete has worked in numerous African countries and Iraq. Indigo Telecom Ltd – (IT) +254 20 3876805/6/7/8 Office, +254 733 596506 Mobile, +88216 4333 9090 Thuraya pete@indigo.co.ke, http://www.indigotelecom.com

Our Partners

Elephants live big lives and no single organisation can hope to secure a future for them on its own. STE is proud to be at the heart of a growing coalition united to save elephants.

Funding

Save the Elephants relies on donations from individuals and foundations to fund its work to secure a future for elephants. Our conservation activities are built on a continued pioneering research into the ecology and behaviour of elephants and on deep, data-driven insights into the ivory trade and its impacts on elephant populations.

Get In Touch With Us

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