Elephants and Bees

The Elephants and Bees Project is an innovative study using an in-depth understanding of elephant behaviour to reduce damage from crop-raiding elephants using their instinctive avoidance of African honey bees. The project explores the use of novel Beehive Fences as a natural elephant deterrent creating a social and economic boost to poverty-stricken rural communities through the sustainable harvesting of “Elephant-Friendly Honey”. Dr. Lucy King established this award winning research project, and leads this exciting collaboration between Save the Elephants, Oxford University and Disney’s Animal Kingdom.

 

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In Kenya, the beehive fences have so far been tried by three communities as an HEC mitigation tool for reducing elephant crop-raiding. The first project site was a small but very successful trial with a few farmers of Ex-Erok in Laikipia, where the experiment used the first design of a beehive fence using beautiful, traditional but old, log beehives. The numbers of crop-raids were reduced during the initial trial in 2008 (see King et al., 2009) but soon after, the farmers had an expansive electric fence built to protect the whole community from elephant crop-raids.

The second project site was established in two Turkana sub-villages of Ngare Mara, just south of Save the Elephants’ core project site of Samburu and Buffalo Springs National Reserves. Here the beehive fence design was evolved and developed to incorporate the more advanced Kenyan Top Bar Hive with an embedded queen excluder. Research here was entirely participatory and all 64 farmers in the community were involved in the project in one way or another.

The third, and now core project site in Kenya, is with the Taita people of Sagalla, next to Tsavo East National Park boundary in southern Kenya. This project has slowly expanded from two fences in 2009 to support 20 HEC-affected farmers with individual beehive fences as of 2014. It was in Sagalla that the first Langstroth beehives were tested forming a partnership with the Fair Trade company, Honey Care Africa, to help adapt the beehive to fit inside the fence design.

Results show that crop-raiding of elephants has been successfully reduced in the beehive fence protected farms in Sagalla community and it is here that the Elephants and Bees project has built a friendly Elephants and Bees Project office, a Rufford Honey Processing Room and a training center, so that other farming communities around Sagalla and farmers from other regions of Kenya can be trained.

The Elephants and Bees Project is an award winning innovative study offering a real solution to the human elephant conflict problem. In addition to Kenya, more partners are now using beehive fences in various parts of the world and to-date Dr. King has visited and helped set up hives in Botswana, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Sri Lanka, and has resulted in several scientific publications. So far the project has been awarded The Future for Nature Award (2013), The St Andrews Prize for the Environment (2013), and The UNEP/CMS Thesis Award (2011).

For more information on the project please visit www.elephantsandbees.com. If you would like to arrange a site visit please get in touch with Dr. King on lucy@savetheelephants.org.

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The fate of elephants is in the balance. The record price of ivory has attracted organised crime, rebel militias and even terrorist groups, fuelling a surge of poaching across the continent. Without the outstanding support and generosity of our donors, STE would not be able to continue securing a future for the elephants. We urgently need your support, while there is still time. You can be of vital assistance by donating to either our core funds or to any of our projects.

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The fate of elephants is in the balance. The record price of ivory has attracted organised crime, rebel militias and even terrorist groups, fuelling a surge of poaching across the continent. Without the outstanding support and generosity of our donors, STE would not be able to continue securing a future for the elephants. We urgently need your support, while there is still time. You can be of vital assistance by donating to either our core funds or to any of our projects.

How You Can Help

Over the last years our world-leading conservation efforts have been possible thanks to the dedication and generosity of loyal supporters. To join them you can donate in a number of ways:

Elephants are fast disappearing from the wild. Without urgent, international action they could be gone within a generation. The Elephant Crisis Fund provides rapid, catalytic support for the most effective projects designed to stop the killing, thwart traffickers and end the demand for ivory. 100% of all donations reach the field.

Save the Elephants is funded almost entirely by private donations. It is only through the generous support of donors that we are able to continue our important elephant conservation work. We rely entirely on funds, grants and donations from around the world, so thank you for helping us to secure a future for these fascinating creatures.

Our unique brand of conservation education encourages students to become ambassadors of their rich environment. We also give opportunities to friends around the world to help educate young minds and improve the infrastructure of their schools. Sponsor a child & help build a future for wildlife.